bellinghman: (Default)
OK, this is to note a variation in the recipé, so I know what I've done (and it's only just gone into the over):

500g potatoes, steamed then mashed
75 ml olive oil
1000g plain flour
3 tsp salt
75 g fresh yeast
250 ml water

Mixing the flour and mashed potato, and adding more flour and water as I go until I've got a stiffer dough.

The rising is nothing like as explosive (about 90 minutes to double in volume) and I'm baking for 40 minutes rather than 30.

ETA: Note that these are the changes: the loaf is still steam baked, as per previous post. See comments for picture of the result.

Also, I moistened the top and added poppy seed to the top.

Conclusion: a bit more water (this was half the previous amount) next time, and maybe a 35 minute bake.
bellinghman: (Default)
OK, this is to note a variation in the recipé, so I know what I've done (and it's only just gone into the over):

500g potatoes, steamed then mashed
75 ml olive oil
1000g plain flour
3 tsp salt
75 g fresh yeast
250 ml water

Mixing the flour and mashed potato, and adding more flour and water as I go until I've got a stiffer dough.

The rising is nothing like as explosive (about 90 minutes to double in volume) and I'm baking for 40 minutes rather than 30.

ETA: Note that these are the changes: the loaf is still steam baked, as per previous post. See comments for picture of the result.

Also, I moistened the top and added poppy seed to the top.

Conclusion: a bit more water (this was half the previous amount) next time, and maybe a 35 minute bake.
bellinghman: (Default)
I've been playing around with a recipe from my late godfather, which was published twice that I know of, firstly in a book on Bakery by his mother, and then in his own book on Cakes. The Florises were a family of bakers, based in Soho (on Brewer Street, you may still be able to find a door lintel with the name 'Floris' carved into it), having immigrated from Hungary in the 1930s. They liked this bread well enough to sell it under their family name, and my mother remembers it fondly from when she was young.

It's unusual in making use of potato, as well as plain (not bread) flour. The result is a soft, light bread that gets eaten before it has a chance to go stale, but stays fresh much longer than any other bread I've made.

This is the version of the recipe I used on Saturday. It's a little modified from the original, which actually uses twice as much salt, and a little more yeast.

the recipé )
bellinghman: (Default)
I've been playing around with a recipe from my late godfather, which was published twice that I know of, firstly in a book on Bakery by his mother, and then in his own book on Cakes. The Florises were a family of bakers, based in Soho (on Brewer Street, you may still be able to find a door lintel with the name 'Floris' carved into it), having immigrated from Hungary in the 1930s. They liked this bread well enough to sell it under their family name, and my mother remembers it fondly from when she was young.

It's unusual in making use of potato, as well as plain (not bread) flour. The result is a soft, light bread that gets eaten before it has a chance to go stale, but stays fresh much longer than any other bread I've made.

This is the version of the recipe I used on Saturday. It's a little modified from the original, which actually uses twice as much salt, and a little more yeast.

the recipé )

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